Lesson 29: Don’t even start a translation business without a logo

I love words, same as you. I was never particularly gifted when comes to drawing or painting, or designing. I’d rather write a short novel than express the same concept visually! I think we all have that in common. However, we just can’t do without logos anymore. It’s business time, even for translators. And logos make us be recognised, remembered,…

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Lesson 28: Translation events all of us should attend

Even though I don't particularly enjoy the tube, crowded buses, and long queues, I must admit that living in London has huge advantages for active professionals. In my opinion, this year is filled with interesting and helpful translation events, and I'm trying to squeeze in as many of them as possible. I do recommend attending various kinds of events to…

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Lesson 27: Taking care of a translating brain

Most of the time I work on shorter and easier to digest projects. I like this mode of work: it's more dynamic, less boring and equally rewarding. I can translate for some time and spend the rest of it perfecting my work, polishing the surface and rounding up the edges. But larger projects do come in, and keep me engaged…

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Lesson 26: Stop doubting your skills in languages and deliver confident translation and interpreting

One of most significant and potentially life-changing advice I’ve ever received in relation to my work as a translator and interpreter came from an ex-actor. She said that she knew lots of conference interpreters making a similar mistake that a lot of actors make: they don’t trust their basic skill, and instead of delivering outstanding performance, they’re too stressed thinking…

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Lesson 25: Should translators use free e-mail accounts?

There's a number of websites and articles online providing tips and trick for translators, and advising on growing freelance businesses. A vast majority of them suggests really useful solutions, like having your own website, or proofreading your CV one hundred times before sending it out. It's not uncommon to learn that one of the very first things to get is…

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Lesson 24: Communicating quality of translation

When I first started as a translator, I had bits of background knowledge in economics that helped me run my business. One of the things I knew back then was that, in broad terms, all companies can compete between each other on price, service, time of delivery, or quality. Of course, I knew that it’s always the easiest to offer…

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Lesson 22: Online marketplaces and translators?

Rated People – for quality, local tradesmen. I’ve seen it for the first time while enjoying my morning gym session about 2 weeks ago, happily entertaining me on a treadmill. I bothered to think of sending them a note about the lack of political correctness, but gave up the idea in the end. Then it popped out somewhere online, and…

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Lesson 21: Translator’s block

I was sitting and staring at a blank piece of paper for some time. Around 5 weeks, to be precise. It’s not that I didn’t know what to write, I just had to translate. But believe me, even though I am just a translator, I have just experienced the longest and most terrifying writer’s block I ever had. And it’s…

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Lesson 20: So you want to be a translation project manager

During my recent webinar with eCPD webinars, I mentioned that I’ve seen tons of CVs as a project manager in my last in-house job. I was then asked by one of attendees what to do to become a project manager. Just one sentence of warning before we start: project management has very little to do with translation. Project management seems…

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